Thursday, February 20, 2020

IN THE GARDEN OF DISCONTENT

Title: In the Garden of Discontent
Author: Lily White
Genre: Romantic Suspense
Release Date: February 19, 2020

This is a love story.
It’s brutal.
Heartwrenching.
Terrifying, honest, and raw.
But a love story nonetheless...because it is so beautiful.
Ensley:
Noah Carter was the type of guy that every girl wanted.
Gorgeous. Talented. Smart and kind.
He was the world that revolved around me even though I didn’t deserve him.
But then something went wrong.
He snapped maybe, just lost his mind.
I found him the night my family died, their blood staining his hands.
I put him in prison. I got my revenge.
But then years later he broke free and stole me away from my life.
Noah:
You couldn’t know Ensley without wanting to strangle her.
She was beautiful. She was wild. She was the girl next door.
I grew up with her by my side.
I watched her destroy herself while I held on.
I protected her when she had been blind to the danger that surrounded her.
I let her go once, only to find her again.
She would see me this time no matter what.
“I hate you,” she hissed, hair wild around her face like it always had been.
“I know.”
Her body shook, and her shoulders wilted, arms curled around her body, fingernails digging into her skin. “I need-“
“I know,” I said, stepping forward to grab onto her so she wouldn’t have to say it.
Our eyes met in the shadow of that room. “You don’t need to say it. I know.”
I’ve always known...but I couldn’t do anything about it.
Ens melted in my grasp, like water through my hands, trying to slip away and escape so she could damage herself in some way I couldn’t stop, but I wouldn’t let her.
Not this time.
Not again.
Gripping my hand over the back of her head, I pulled her to me, my mouth locking over hers, tongue risking the clench of her teeth because she would fight me tooth and nail while this happened, but that’s what she needed.
To fight me.
To injure me.
Because she had never been able to fight them.
Fingernails cut into my biceps, her body thrashing to break free, but I held on and kissed her like I was giving her the air she needed to breathe.
Shoving Ensley down on the bed, I grabbed the back of my shirt to strip it off, every muscle in my body tense because I knew I was a bastard for wanting this.
For wanting her.
For taking advantage, even though it had never been my intent.
Lily White is a romance writer who likes to dabble on the taboo side of eroticism. She is most known for her Masters Series, Target This, Wishing Well, and Asylum. In addition to dark romance Lily writes contemporary romance, taboo romance, and psychological thrillers. Lily enjoys stretching her writing muscles by continuing to challenge herself with each book she publishes.
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Thursday, February 13, 2020

THE RELATIONSH!T SHOW

Title: The Relationshit Show
Author: S. Cole
Genre: Romantic Comedy
Release Date: February 13, 2020
Cover Design: Book Cover Kingdom
Once upon a time, there was a young girl who thought she found the love of her life at only fourteen years old . . . but after five years of puppy love combined with ‘we think we’re grown’ love, her fairy tale came to an end.

That girl was me. 
I’m Cole and this is my story, my journey, and as it turned out, my hot mess of a dating life.
There are the guys who ghosted me and also the one who returned like a zombie again and again. There are drunken adventures and one night stands. There's even that time I became a bride for the span of a night.
While struggling with writer’s block and depression, I jotted it all down, kept the records, and now I’m ready to share it with you. 
Yeah, you! 
I’ve condensed it all into seventeen episodes of love, life, lust and the chaos of millennial dating. So get comfortable, grab your popcorn, some tissues, and of course that bottle of wine. It’s time to binge on your favorite reality star... me.
When he arrived, I ordered the Uber, and in no time, one showed up. We got dropped off at the restaurant. Driver earned extra points when he asked me if I wanted to order a large cheese dip. However, he lost points when he stuck his chip in the dip, sucked the cheese off of the chip, and then stuck said chip back into the queso. I was baffled and confused and hurt that he would treat the cheese dip that way. “Why’d you do that?” I couldn’t help myself. I had to ask. He shrugged his shoulders. “I like the cheese. I don’t like the chip.” Blasphemy. I decided to shrug it off. I mean, at least the man liked cheese. You may be shocked to know, I’ve dated some guys who don’t. Extreme blasphemy. After the crazy queso fiasco, things were all fine and dandy . . .
S. Cole, otherwise known as Shay, is kind of a hot mess. A fun hot mess, but a mess nonetheless. She gets shit done, but . . . ya get the point. Shay is a daughter, sister, friend, and great worker! She’s really awesome at all of those things, but she probably writes best. She has written stories for as long as she can remember. Like, at least since she was seven years old. That’s when she wrote her first book. Shay loved conjuring up stories so much, she continued writing them into her twenties. But now, she can drink while she’s doing it, so it’s even better! Maybe that’s why the characters that reside in her little black heart finally bothered her enough that she had to actually share them with readers. #winemademedoit

Shay grew up in a home where she was taught to embrace her inner nerd and creativity . . . and her short stature. At 5’1, Shay is that short girl who writes about the deranged and devious. For some reason, she strayed from her usual love of crime fiction to write something funny. She once told her friend ‘I write dark shit, but when I’m in a dark place, I’ve got to write light’.
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Tuesday, February 11, 2020

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF CLYDE KENNARD

Title: The Life and Times of Clyde Kennard
Author: Derek R. King
Genre: US Civil Rights, African American, Black History
Release Date: October 13, 2018
In 1955, Clyde Kennard, a decorated army veteran, was forced to cut short the final year of his studies at the University of Chicago and return home to Mississippi due to family circumstances, where Kennard made the decision to complete his education. Yet still on the eve of the civil rights movement in America, Kennard’s decision would be one of the first serious attempts to integrate any public school at the college level in the state.

The Life and Times of Clyde Kennard tells the true story of Chicago University student Clyde Kennard’s efforts to complete his further education in his home state of Mississippi at Mississippi Southern College (now the University of Southern Mississippi) against the backdrop of the institutionalized social order of the times and the prevailing winds of change attempting to blow that social order away.
Author Derek R. King shares his extensive research into Kennard’s life, and he touches on the key events that shaped those times and the impact of the events on people involved on both sides of what was an extremely heated and emotive debate.
In the end, Clyde Kennard would take a nonconfrontational route to change, and as James Meredith’s admission to the University of Mississippi became more widely known at the time, Kennard became the forgotten man. But his story is an uplifting and inspiring story of perseverance, hardship, and committed determination to right wrongs, and it is a testament to the enduring legacy of the civil rights movement and its challenge to the status quo of injustice.


“Clyde Kennard's story is one that should be told far and wide and given its rightful place alongside all other well-renowned heroes of the civil rights movement. Derek R. King has made a significant contribution to literature indeed." - Literary Titan.

“I approached Derek King’s book on my client Clyde Kennard with scepticism. Could a white Scottish man be entrusted with the story of an unsung hero of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement? Yes, King’s book is a revelation. Read it. Learn. Never forget.” Professor Steven A Drizin Clinical Professor of Law at the Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law in Chicago
“This book is a real page turner; it tells the story of one man's efforts to enrol at college and the twists and turns that happened to him on the way and beyond.” Lilymay Amazon Reviewer

4
Return to Mississippi

Abandoning his degree course prematurely at the University of Chicago, as well as leaving the relative peace and security of Chicago to run the family farm in a segregated and volatile Mississippi, could not have been easy for Clyde. He remained determined to ensure this break from the routine of his studies was as short as possible and to avoid his previous years of study counting for naught. He hoped and planned to complete his degree course once the farm business was back on track, but Mississippi was a state in the grip of civil resistance and unrest with a determination to preserve segregation.

After returning to Eatonville, and still with his mother’s Baptist upbringing influence, he joined the Mary Magdalene Baptist Church in Hattiesburg, codirected their youth choir, and started the first Bible class for young people, becoming a Sunday school teacher in the process.

As a young girl, Gloria Peck was in Clyde’s Sunday school class and later remembered that he “taught his students with a firm but gentle hand, planning Christmas plays and delivering fruit baskets to every child in the area on the holidays.” 2 Viola Grant, who also worked with the youth choir, recalled that even his fellow church volunteers thought he was a bit of a “goody-goody.” 3 She added that in an effort to “corrupt” Clyde, a group of friends took him to the Embassy Club in Palmers Crossing. Although they knew Clyde did not drink, they ordered a bottle of wine and poured him a glass. But when they left at the end of the night, “that glass of wine was still there,” she said. “He was just a different sort of person.”

Clyde became good friends with his neighbor, the barrel-chested fifty-three-year-old Vernon Dahmer Sr., whose farm was only two miles from Clyde’s. Dahmer was an NAACP activist, and Clyde joined the NAACP, serving as president of the local NAACP Youth Council founded by Dahmer, who also acted as an adviser. It was through this involvement that Clyde met Medgar Evers, the NAACP’s field secretary in Mississippi, who traveled to Hattiesburg to assist in setting up an NAACP youth chapter. This was when Evers first became aware of Clyde’s NAACP youth work. There were many parallels between these two men. They were the same age, they’d grown up in rural farming families, they were World War II army veterans who had pursued further education on their return to the United States through the GI Bill, and neither was intimidated by white segregationists. 

Clyde also attended statewide NAACP meetings in Jackson, and as the pair’s relationship grew, Medgar developed an enormous respect for Clyde. “Clyde was like a brother to him,” recalled Joyce Ladner. 

Clyde mentored both Joyce and Dorie Ladner, fifteen-year-old sisters who were both members of the youth council and pupils at Earl Travillion High School. Clyde tutored Joyce in English and history, and on one occasion, he helped her write a speech on the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments of the United States Constitution. She recalled that Clyde “took his time” with Joyce and her sister, adding that “he was very patient.” 6 She graduated valedictorian of her high school, while her sister. Dorie graduated salutatorian. 

Clyde was serving on the Eatonville school board when the authorities decided to consolidate the Palmers Crossing and Eatonville Negro schools. He was incensed that the 125 black students from Eatonville had to travel eleven miles to attend classes at Palmers Crossing. To make matters worse, the Eatonville Negro students passed the all-white Eatonville school enroute to Palmers Crossing.

He joined others in circulating a petition to have the Eatonville schoolchildren attend the closest school, the all-white Eatonville school. Predictably, their petition was unsuccessful. In the segregationist world of Mississippi in 1955, regardless of the United States Supreme Court’s Brown decision, the public education system continued under the “separate but
equal” banner.

 After settling back in the Eatonville community, Clyde began to develop and expand the family farm, taking a loan to buy a plot of land in Eatonville and purchasing three thousand hens to start a chicken farm. In June, to supplement the farm’s income and earn additional funds to repay the loan, Clyde set up business as a “small gardening and handyman service,” purchasing “1 push mower, 4 power mowers, 1 wheel barrow and numerous assortment of gardening tools,” as well as a pickup truck a few months later. 

With a second source of income and the family farm set up to work in a way that would allow him to continue his studies, Clyde turned his attention to completing his degree course. Similar to the Eatonville school pupils, the nearest Negro college for Clyde was around ninety miles
away, at Jackson State College in Jackson; however, the nearest all-white college, Mississippi Southern College (MSC) in Hattiesburg, was only about five miles from the farm and around a fifteen-minute drive. With his commitments to his mother and the farm, Jackson State College, at ninety or so miles away, was not a practical option, as he wanted to finish his education close to home. To allow him to both complete his degree and run the farm, MSC was the obvious choice.

* * *

Mississippi Southern College (MSC) was approaching its fiftieth anniversary, and construction of a new library facility, at a cost of $855,000 to accommodate two hundred thousand volumes, had just been completed. 

At the time MSC was described by journalist Ronald A. Hollander as “white-columned, red bricked, broad walked and ivied, with lily pond and kissing bridge.” 9 MSC at the time was essentially a liberal arts school, and the intention of its alumni was its eventual status as a university.

The college marching band; the cheerleaders, named the Dixie Darlings; and the football and basketball teams were all white. The mascot was “Old Nat,” who rode on a horse called Son of Dixie. Old Nat took his name from former Confederate cavalry general Nathan Bedford Forrest,
who had tormented Union troops during the Civil War with lightning raids and from whom Forrest County itself took its name.

Social life at MSC was typical for the time, revolving around sports events and bus trips downtown to see the latest movies, but with curfew at 9:00 p.m. for freshmen girls. 

As with all public education in segregationist Mississippi, MSC was entirely dependent on the state for its funding; its president, William David McCain, was responsible to the state-appointed Board of Trustees of Institutions of Higher Learning; and by definition, MSC’s entire student
body of around 4,200 were white.

McCain, a former army general and “hardcore segregationist,” became the college’s president on August 18, 1955, promising to keep the campus “dusty or muddy with construction.” This driving ambition reflected the alumni’s desire to secure university status and for MSC to join the state’s other flagship schools, Ole Miss and Mississippi State University. The last thing McCain wanted under his presidency was adverse publicity from an integration attempt. Any question of threatening the whites-only tradition would adversely affect the pursuit of university status.

* * *

Clyde believed that common sense would prevail despite the political climate in Mississippi in the wake of the Brown decision and that integration would be achieved. He decided to enroll at MSC to complete his degree course while at the same time running the family farm. Unlike
Medgar Evers’s petitioners, Clyde’s enrollment was not motivated by the NAACP but simply his own desire to complete his degree course. “Clyde just wanted to finish school,” recalled Dorie Ladner. “He wasn’t trying to make a political statement.” 
While not motivated by the NAACP, as a member of its Forrest County chapter, he had discussed his intention to enroll with them. Far from any discouragement, local president J. C. Fairley and fellow member Joseph Otis actively encouraged Clyde to apply for admission. 
Derek R. King, is a poet, musician and published author. He lives in Scotland, enjoys the great outdoors, good malt whisky, art (particularly art nouveau, deco, impressionism, surrealist and contemporary periods) and photography.

You might spot him on a hill somewhere with his camera fist pumping and quietly muttering "Yes!" to himself if he captures a great image.
His poetry, which covers diverse topics, has been variously described as "emotive", "raw", "powerful" and "fun", a collection of his work is being compiled.
His main work to date has been the award winning non-fiction Civil Rights era book, "The Life And Times Of Clyde Kennard", which tells the true story of one man's attempt to go to college in those challenging times.
Derek has written several short stories one of which, "Defying Convention", is included in the recently published "Winter Chills" collection of short stories, which received a five-star review from literary Titan and their Gold book award this month.

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